About Author

 

About Author

 

Tyrone A. Ash was raised in the City of Hollywood, Florida in the community of Liberia. Ash became the first student body president of the first integrated high school in Broward County. In the 10th Grade, he asked his American History teacher, “Why was it when black people were discussed in this class they were all slaves?” The teacher sent him to the office for disturbing his class. This episode led to his desire to know more about his people and Ancestors. The journey of research had begun.
In the 12th Grade, there were two events of civil disobedience. One event was a school walk-out for equal treatment for students of African descent on campus. The other event was for fair and respectable treatment for school’s football team members of African descent. Ash was on the forefront of each disturbance. These experiences increased his desire for more knowledge of his Ancestors.
In college at Southern Illinois University, Ash was a student employee at the Black Studies Department for three years. The thirst for “Black” knowledge within him was fed. He studied under some of the most famous scholars in African-American, African and Caribbean History. Dr. Walter G. Robinson and Dr. Henry Wilson were a few. His assignment was a teaching task on African-American History at the Galconda Job Corps Center in Kentucky. Participants increased their knowledge of self-history, ancestry and the “Story of the Diaspora”.
In the college town of Carbondale, Ash was a participant in the Community Empowerment Programs of the Black Panthers. He served breakfast in the mornings to elementary school children of the community. At the end of college classes for the day, he returned to the community to conduct after school tutoring.
Ash was on the front line of a protest march in the City of Cario, Illinois with several college students. The march was a part of an economic boycott of the merchants in the city by people of African descent. The protest was successful and changed history of the city.
About the Author
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Ash graduated in 1973 and returned to Hollywood, Florida, his hometown. With a Government Degree there was not a job for him within any city or county agency. His career in community building and youth empowerment began. The African Proverb “each one teach one” became his theme.
He wrote proposals for community agencies, cities, and private not for profit organizations. Housing developments were built while teaching community residents how to prepare for homeownership and the value of owning a home. Business plans for small and minority businesses were written. Bond financing plans for housing and commercial ventures were submitted and funded. His work with youth programs included: drug prevention, music instruction and cultural performances. A very high level of success in these fields was experienced from his work for the next thirty years.
He was a member of the Fair Share and Economic Development Committee of the Fort Lauderdale Chapter of the NAACP for eighteen years. This committee was ranked Number One for five consecutive years among national chapters for its success in securing public and private contracts for minority participation in employment and membership on boards and commit
As time passed, the passion of his first love returned and took control. Assuming the position of historian for his family, he began to write and conduct research on his Ancestors. A comprehensive bank of family data and history was developed.
His granddaughter of about three years old asked him a question. The question was “GP why you like that”? His granddaughter demanded the full story on the journey in the life of people of African descent. The end product of the research was the publication of this book, “The Story GrandPa Told of American and World African Legends and Culture”. The story was designed to emphasize how all people of African descent have the same history. This book is proclaimed as a personal reference on the Story of the Diaspora which increases knowledge of self- history and ancestry for success.